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Krambo

Running An Autometer Wide Band O2 Sensor With Hp Tuners

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For those of you that use HPTuners Pro for tuning and add a wideband (with outputs for a data logger) you most likely purchased a wideband that already is populated in the VCM scanner therefore it is a simple click and insert to begin logging. The most popular ones that already are set-up in HPT include: AEM, LC1 (innovate), PLX, FJO and DynoJet to name a few. Well, I wanted to be different and also wanted my aftermarket gauges to match the Silverado SS gauge cluster so I purchased an Autometer wideband O2 gauge in the Phantom series. The challenge is that in order to use the outputs from the wideband in HPT, you need to configure a custom User Defined EIO Auxiliary input so that you have accurate data to tune with. Here is how I did it:

 

Step 1 – Set-up your Autometer Wideband to read from 10 – 16 AFR’s. I chose these values for accuracy sake. I know the meter can read wider than that however who really cares about outside that range. I would rather have more accurate data over a tighter use-able range than less accurate data over a wider range. Setting a 10-16AFR range is critical before continuing so follow the instructions that Autometer includes with the Wide Band O2 Meter to set up as 10-16 AFR's.

 

Step 2 – Create a custom EIO Aux. input. Open the VCM scanner, use the Default Imperial Configuration and click on “Display” “Table View” (See Illustration 1). Right click on the “EIO Input 1” allowing a new window to pop up with three choices. Choose “Insert” (See Illustration 1). When you click on “Insert” a new window pops up called “Insert AUX’s”. Looking at this tree of choices, click on “User Defined” and then double click on “Configure User Defined” (See Illustration 1).

 

Illustration 1:

HPTWBConfig1.jpg

 

You should now have a “Configure User Defined Enhanced IO Input” table opened (See Illustration 2). This is the table where some math is involved (YIKES!!!). Click once on the first line item ( 1. ). To the right, name your EIO input 1. I chose to keep it simple and call it “Autometer Wide Band O2” (See Illustration 2). Just under that, give it an abbreviation of your choice. The next line is a drop down menu for “sensor” of which you should choose “Air Fuel Ratio”. Finally, select the units which will be “afr”.

 

Illustration 2:

HPTWBConfig2.jpg

 

We are now going to write the formula for the Autometer WB O2 gauge in the same table. Remember that we set our Autometer WB to accurately read between 10 and 16 AFR’s in step one. That is critical for this formula here. Another critical bit of information that must be recognized is that the outputs on the Autometer WB are linear from 0 to 4 volts whereas most wideband outputs are 0-5V. Now that we know the output is given in a linear scale of 0-4V and that the gauge is set-up to read 10 to 16 AFR’s (range of 6 AFR’s), we now need to calculate the slope of that line.

 

For simplicity sake, we will define slope as Rise / Run.

 

 

Slope = Rise / Run = 4 (Volts) / 6 (AFR's) = 0.6667

 

 

The slope of a linear line with a rise of 4 and a run of 6 is 0.6667. This is correct if we are reading AFR’s starting at 0 and going to 6 however we are not. The solution is to add a base 10 to our formula to shift the slope from 0-6AFR’s to a 10-16AFR’s.

 

Now let’s take all of those calculations and plug them into our “Configure User Defined Enhanced IO Input” table. Looking at Illustration 2, you will want to click on “Linear” and fill in the denominator with our calculated slope value from above which is 0.6667. In the next open field of the equation, we must enter “10” to shift our linear slope from 0-6AFR’s to 10-16AFR’s as mentioned above. Now, looking at the graph that results from our formula, you can see that the slope of the line intersects the point of the graph at 4 volts and 16AFR’s (See Illustration 2 where the intercept of 4 volts and 16 AFR is circled). This indicates to us that when the Wide Band puts out a 4 volt signal, it will correlate to an AFR of 16. Being that the scale is linear, you can see that 2 volts equates to 13 AFR’s and so on.

 

Once you are sure your formula is correct, click on the “commit changes” icon to save your changes to the EIO-1. Your table display should now show “Autometer Wide Band O2” or whatever you named it in the EIO-1 input location!

 

Now go to “File”, “Save Configuration As” and save all of this hard work. I personally call this configuration “Default Imperial AM Wideband”.

 

Step 3 – Hooking up your wideband to the HP Tuners EIO Interface connector. There are two output wires from the Autometer Wide Band (Blue and a Blue / Black). The blue wire is the + signal wire and should go to PIN 1 on the interface. The Blue/Black is the ground wire and needs to go to PIN 5 on the interface (See Illustration 3).

 

Illustration 3:

HPTWBConfig5.jpg

 

Now fire up your truck, open the new configuration you just made and begin logging. You should be able to see your AFR on the chart display since the WB sensor parameter has already been inserted in chart 2 of the Chart Display. I now suggest looking into setting up some histograms using your new Wide Band and discover the importance of the WB for fuel tuning!

 

 

...I did not get into correcting for a voltage offset in my write-up however correcting for a voltage offset involves the same formula I outlined above by just adding the offset difference to the base 10 number. A detailed explanation can be found here: HP Tuner Forum link (Voltage Offset)

Edited by Krambo
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For those of you that use HPTuners Pro for tuning and add a wideband (with outputs for a data logger) you most likely purchased a wideband that already is populated in the VCM scanner therefore it is a simple click and insert to begin logging. The most popular ones that already are set-up in HPT include: AEM, LC1 (innovate), PLX, FJO and DynoJet to name a few. Well, I wanted to be different and also wanted my aftermarket gauges to match the Silverado SS gauge cluster so I purchased an Autometer wideband O2 gauge in the Phantom series. The challenge is that in order to use the outputs from the wideband in HPT, you need to configure a custom User Defined EIO Auxiliary input so that you have accurate data to tune with. Here is how I did it:

 

Good info. I had to do alot of searching to get find what the setting should be for my 5778.

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Maybe I haven't fooled with it enough. But I am trying to get my hpt to log my wideband in lambda. I can get my gauge to log and show in stoch but I can't get it to log in lambda. I have been able to get the gauge to display lambda so I have to be getting closer. Any quick ideas?

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The LM-1's second analog output is factory programmed to provide a linear output between 1V and 2V for an AFR of 10 to 20. So I should set up a custom EIO input?

volts=2

AFRs=10

2/10=.2 slope

then I am stuck with the base ten part...

also if we can put up a How-to verify you widebands reading using HPT, that might help as guys get them and need to make sure they are working correctly before doing their WOT tuning.

Edited by detjoe

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Maybe I haven't fooled with it enough. But I am trying to get my hpt to log my wideband in lambda. I can get my gauge to log and show in stoch but I can't get it to log in lambda. I have been able to get the gauge to display lambda so I have to be getting closer. Any quick ideas?

 

Perrsonally, I haven't messed with Lambda. I finally found a consistant fuel source (no ethanol or O2 added) and dialed everything in.

 

Great find Kevin!

 

Ha! That is my write up Art...I didn't find it anywhere.

 

The LM-1's second analog output is factory programmed to provide a linear output between 1V and 2V for an AFR of 10 to 20. So I should set up a custom EIO input?

volts=2

AFRs=10

2/10=.2 slope

then I am stuck with the base ten part...

also if we can put up a How-to verify you widebands reading using HPT, that might help as guys get them and need to make sure they are working correctly before doing their WOT tuning.

Yea, Innovate is a bit confusing IMHO. There are many options as you know. The key will to be initially setting up your wideband outputs so you know what you are working with. If you say there is a 1-2V output (seems low) then yes, you are on the right track HOWEVER, there is a pre programmed LM1 AUX input in HP Tuners. Are you starting with that one? From what I see, hardly anybody uses that one since the offsets are always off.

 

The +10 in the formula is where you would adjust for offset. Just because Innovate says you will have a linear X to Y profile, doesn't mean you will (and from what I read, Innovate is often not linear). Start with 10 and then you will need to adjust from there. In a nutshell, you will need to set-up the wideband to output a given voltage at your richest setpoint and then the same voltage at your leanest. The wideband calibration is then performed. The difference in what the reading is and what the output was is your offset. That number is then added or subtracted from the "10". This is were a "verification" that your wideband is working properly before tuning is recognized. This should be outlined in the instruction manual for the wideband. Check out that link I posted in post one.

 

Here is a good discussion on the Innovate LM1 interface with MPVI:

 

HP Tuner LM1 configuration

 

Read post #3 as he outlines what you need to do pretty well.

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What would 0V translate to in AFR and what would 4 volts translate to afr? Is 0 volts=10 afr and 4 volts=16 afr with this method I want to know because I log in lambda.

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What would 0V translate to in AFR and what would 4 volts translate to afr? Is 0 volts=10 afr and 4 volts=16 afr with this method I want to know because I log in lambda.

 

Yes, see illustration 2 for the slope and the X-axis / Y-axis intercepts to correlate voltage to AFR.

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